Tag Archives: Creativity

KOYAANISQATSI (SCREENING & LIVE SOUNDTRACK BY OLA)

This fantastic local act are presenting their musical talents in the visual arts world, a great collaboration of music and film is about to happen…LIVE!

Next month a screening of the 1982 documentary Koyaanisqatsi accompanied by an original soundtrack by Manchester based cinematic two piece OLA, will take place. This renowned documentary reveals how humanity has grown apart from nature.

Manchester duo OLA will be performing their live soundtrack to accompany a screening of Ron Fricke’s 1982 documentary film Koyaanisqatsi. OLA’s score crosses electronic, ambient, classical and pop into a cinematic soundtrack tied perfectly to the film’s themes and visuals.poster

Drawing its title from the Hopi word meaning “life out of balance,” this renowned documentary reveals how humanity has grown apart from nature. Featuring extensive footage of natural landscapes and elemental forces, the film gives way to many scenes of modern civilization and technology. Given its lack of narration and dialogue, the production makes its points solely through imagery and music, with many scenes either slowed down or sped up for dramatic effect.

The screening will also open with a short film by film-maker Paul Daly called I’Dismantle with a soundtrack by OLA.

The event take place at Kings Arm’s, Salford on Friday 14th of October from 7.30pm.

Book online here at www.wegottickets.com and call Kings Arms on 0161 832 3605 for more info. Tickets are priced £3 and can be brought from http://www.wegottickets.com/event/374096

 

M20 Collective this year so far

Wow, time flies when you’re doings things doesn’t it.

Funny that?!

Well we’ve been doing things this year, and as we find ourselves nearing the final quarter of the 2016 we thought it would be nice to summarise our year to date; and fill you in with the goings on in and around the M20 collective networkings.

As some of you may or may not know, myself (Yemi Bolatiwa) and Joel white are co-founders and leaders of the collective. in 2013 our very own Joel White began making links with small acts and bands in the Withington area, in an endeavour to build a local music scene. Naturally as his musical pal and social companion I intervened and we put our heads together with various friends, supporters and local organisations to put on events, which would lead to the creation of a new community organisation for south Manchester’s creative circles.

 

Now three years later, we continue to create platforms and opportunities, mingle with fellow artists and creatives and put on showcases of talent in the south Manchester area and beyond  – staying true the grass roots origins of the concept.

There’s still time for a final M20 2016 artistic blow-out, and it’s brewing… but for now join us in reminiscing on the events of 2016…

January
A quiet month for most, when we were busy sending emails and having meetings with the Ask My Bull boys, in preparation for their EP launch.

February
A certain male M20 collective co-founder has his final 20-something’th birthday, days before the AMB event was due to erupt.

March
POW – a creative explosion of flamboyant gypsy punk was splurged all over the walls of Aatma. What a night, Ask my bull succeeded to show they are one of  Manchester best and most unique live acts and we were happy to help support their self-title EP release. To say it was a success would be an understatement. Relive the night in the video below…

On 8th March, The International Women’s Day #IWD16 happened, so we helped Claire Roberts with her line up of spoken word artists and female creatives at the boutique event Women Make Works (and I even did a little sing myself).

April
It rained in Manchester, M20 collective’s 3rd birthday past (uncelebrated) and the cogs were turning for the (Chorlton Arts Festival CAF) show that were to be a part of.

May
We put together a line up of 7 bands including the debut of Lychee and a brilliant start-up by Agbeko an array local fashion stalls and creative works by Elnaz Yazdani, Little Beasties, Threads & Dreads,  Chan Yang Kim and many Others  had Danielle Jawando do a writing workshop as part of the CAF programme a day and night filled with arts and creativity.

 

chAN yANG kIM

(Above Photography exhibit by Chan Yang Kim)

June
There was a heat wave so we were far too exasperated to do anything #BBQs

July
A bit more downtime as mine and Joel’s personal endeavours were taking off with a gig-packed July for Pareidolia and a Manchester Jazz Festival debut.

August
 After 2 months away it’s now time to reconnect, and so the planning begins for our next event. We’ll give you a hint; the concept is borderline ready…

Performers, creatives and artists of all shapes and sizes please get in touch and let yourselves be known as you could be perfect for our winter affair. Until then…

Peas and Love – Yemi Bolatiwa

Email: M20collective@gmail.com or to feature in the next blog for an interview about your work, or to submit an opinion or creative piece email: them20press@gmail.com

Creativity – Collaboration –Community

 

 

M20 Collective do Chorlton Arts Festival

Three years on wards and we’re still on the scene. Ever growing and meeting local artist and creatives to put fantastic events which showcase the talents Manchester has to offer. Our network is growing and the M20 Collective take over sees the coming together of all kinds of unique sounds and visuals in one place, Dulcimer. Manchester artists from musicians and writers to visual artists and crafts men and women. Free all day with a £4 entry for the evening of live music and soul, funk and 60′s music in to the night!
Find out more below about the acts and artists involved! See you there…
PAREIDOLIA
The line up so far includes contemporary fusion band Pareidolia, a melting pot of original sounds and genre styles from jazzy drum and bass to down-tempo soul grooves.
TANGERINECAT
We’re excited to have Tangerinecat a unique duo whose music combines hurdy-gurdy with electronics, keyboards, whistle, mesmerizing vocals and politically-charged lyrics – with a Ukrainian twist.
 
LYCHEE
Lychee is an 8 piece band fronted by Free Wize Men’s Blind MIC,Layfullstop and Mayo De Zulu, with influences ranging from grime and jungle to jazz and indian folk music all produced by Blind MIC, Red Eye HiFi and new up and coming Manchester producer Khadu. It is their first show ever having adapted a 5 piece live band with the existing material and will feature special guests the other 2 members from Free Wize MenAfro Sam and Kiva/KayBey as well as fellow collaborators Sangy and Ellen Lewis.
GOYCO
Ecuadorian duo of talent; think acoustic psychedelic rock influenced by latin american rhythms
AGBEKO
A high-octane afro-rock-funk-psych spectacular from Manchester. Drawing their inspiration and energy from the golden age of 1970s’ Nigerian, Ghanaian and Ethiopian dancefloors, this 7-piece diet-AGBEKO command a wealth of powerful sing-along originals and unique arrangements of afrobeat and ethiojazz rarities.
FOXTALES
Foxtales are a mostly girl band, made up of four girls, and one boy; Amy (guitar/vocals) Cassie (guitar/vocals) Angela (mandolin/vocals) Briony (bass) and The Scoon (drums). They create a dark psychedelic folk, woven with glittering harmonies that tell stories of lust, love and loss.
SLING
Sling blend Hooker-esque licks, stomping drums and meandering bass lines to create something akin to standing on the edge of blues, staring at krautrock and hiphop at the same time
NATALIE WARDLE from the The Beat Chics . Local visual artist and female selecta, will be spinning grooves into the night!
SHORT STORY WORK SHOP
Join writer, Danielle Jawando for a short story workshop 4.00pm- 5.00pm. The workshop is FREE (although participants are asked to make a small donation.) All money raised will be given to YoungMinds, a charity committed to improving the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young adults. You can follow Danielle on: @DanielleJawando she also teaches writing workshops with Creative Writing North West
PLUS… a Laughing Yoga Class in the day to night switch over.
***ARTISTS & CREATIVES EXHIBITING ***
Elnaz Yazdani – Unique Textiles and Jewellery
Ella Blackmore – Handmade Hair Accessories and Vintage
Chan Yan Kim – Urban Photography
Manchester Craft Mafia – Crafts Accessories
Little Beasties – Handmade Headbands
Take a look at the shows we’ve done in the past:

Manchester Literature: David Hartley’s Spiderseed

Manchester is in need of more literature power houses and look-y here, a new one has sprung. This piece by Alex Webb describes the story of Sleep House Press’s latest release by David Hartley

Just over a year ago I sat down with David Hartley to talk about the Manchester writing scene and his first flash fiction collection Threshold. This February sees the release of Hartley’s third flash fiction collection, Spiderseed, and it is an incredible piece of work! This latest release is fully illustrated by the outstanding Emily Ingle, a local writer and illustrator. I was lucky enough to sit down with Hartley again to discuss the journey from Threshold to Spiderseed and the way his writing has changed since we last spoke.

SHP

The collection is named after one of the stories, it came about after he saw a submission call out for Re:Imaginings where he saw an image of ‘branches of a tree that looked like spiders were emerging from them’. Hartley worked this image into a story about seeds that ‘grow trees that produce animals instead of fruit’ and it eventually became ‘Spiderseed’. For anyone who has read Threshold, this origin story will come as no surprise as Hartley has always been an expert at winding the unhinged and the uncanny into the worlds he creates. Whilst both Threshold and Spiderseed give an eerie sense of unease, the former did so by poking fun at superstition whilst the latter is more focused on nature.

What is creepy about nature? What is there to be afraid of? How can it take advantage of us? These are key questions to ask yourself before embarking on your journey into Spiderseed. When I asked Hartley about this transition, he stated ‘I’ve been writing a lot about animals in the past few years. Some of the shorter pieces that have come out of this impulse have ended up in the collection’ such as ‘Trails’ (a personal favourite of mine which sees slugs gather insects to make one unfortunate home-owner suffer). Some of these darker stories stem from his time as a volunteer with the Manchester & Salford RSPCA where Hartley got a clearer insight into how animals are treated. This ‘messy, complex and frustrating situation’ led Hartley to write more and more about the topic, culminating in Spiderseed.

The realm of Spiderseed is best described by Hartley who calls it ‘inherently weird, without being too weird. Of course “spiderseeds” don’t exist but they sound like they could’ve done, somehow, somewhere’. This sense of unreality is best seen in ‘The Librarian’ which sees the titular man turn his library into a time machine. Hartley’s unique narrative brings every aspect of the time machine to life, you can almost smell the old books as you follow the librarian on their next twisted adventure. When asked how he manages to breathe life into his work Hartley noted that the influence of Manchester in Spiderseed, whilst not as obvious as in Threshold, is undeniable. The difference comes about as in Spiderseed Manchester is not the backdrop for these tales and misfortunes, but their catalyst.

david hartley

     (Dave Hartley Above)

Manchester is a ‘curious, mercurial sort of place’ says Hartley. ‘In the guts of the city it can get labyrinthine, the cobbles are soaked in shadows and histories but that same ground is incredibly fertile, especially for the creative industries’. It is this rich bed of creativity that developed the ‘weird, nightmarish and urban’ world of Spiderseed, and the frequent intrusion of the natural world as backdrops that ‘somehow tie everything together and keep it all from collapsing’. However, the city was not the only ingredient in concocting the cast of twisted characters. The Manchester literature scene with all its characters was fundamental to writing Spiderseed. Hartley says that this collection was ‘tested out on spoken word stages, particularly Bad Language and First Draft’.

Discussing what he did differently with Spiderseed compared to Threshold Hartley says ‘it’s not an exact science, but I certainly get a better feel for a flash fiction piece when I’ve road-tested it on a spoken word stage a few times. I owe a heck of a lot to this city and its creatives’. This is testimony for Manchester’s literature scene. Hartley gave a huge thanks to his writing group for testing and developing his style. Some of the pieces in Spiderseed come with a more performative aspect which Hartley credits to Bad Language’s Fat Roland, ‘the master of prop usage and stage littering’. Another key influence is David Gaffney (one half of the hilariously unsettling Les Malheureux) and his flash fictions which have left Hartley eager to ‘emulate the precision and economy of the best Gaffney stories’.

david gaffney.jpg

 

Moving away from his influences, I spoke to Hartley about the actual process of writing Spiderseed and how this differed from Threshold. ‘The process is more fine-tuned and I’m not as precious as I used to be’, says Hartley, ‘if a story hasn’t worked I’m much happier to ditch it and move onto something new, I’m slightly less concerned about experimentation and more with story and truthfulness now I think’. In Spiderseed there is more a direct connection with the stories, giving a clearer message to be heard/read by the audience. Even the more ridiculous stories, such as ‘Most Haunted’, ‘have something to say about various evils, even if that’s not immediately obvious’. This is what is so strong about Hartley’s new collection. In the world he has constructed things are not always what they seem, your first visit to Spiderseed will be nothing like your next. However, you will keep coming back for more.

Spiderseed is out on 25th February, published by Sleepy House Press and fully illustrated by the outstanding Emily Ingle. Check out Sleepy House Press’ Facebook page for details.Like Sleepy House Press on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SleepyHousePress/?fref=ts

Follow David Hartley on twitter: https://twitter.com/DHartleyWriter

Check out the launch party for Spiderseed: https://www.facebook.com/events/1515540278750798/

Story told by Alex Webb

JOIN THE BBC THREE PLAYGROUND

BBC3 and Latimer are looking for you creative lot to get involved with this exciting collaborative project. M20 collective love this idea and are supporting the project by giving our followers the news. The team at Lorimer got in touch so we could spread the word on how to get involved, its your last chance with 48 HOURS TO GO. So read below to find out more and show them what Manchester have to offer!

It’s time to have fun and #JoinThePlayground.

Are you eager to have your voice heard, ideas seen and the chance to get your content commissioned? Then you need to #JoinThePlayground. The Playground is BBC Three and Latimer’s pioneering creative network, set up to help young creatives, all sorts of talents included, develop their work and put it out for the world to see.

In the Playground you’ll be set weekly live briefs based on content broadcast on BBC Three, to which you should respond with complete creative freedom. Upon receipt of your content, you will get weekly feedback from BBC Three and Latimer.

So, whatever your talent may be, we’re looking for it:

Film
Fashion
Comedy
Music
Tech
Design
Content creation
Writing

and everything in between!

If your application is successful, you will gain unprecedented access to a national youth network of brilliant young minds, have the chance to be mentored by industry professionals, and get your voice heard, all whilst co-creating the future of content for BBC Three.

We welcome applications from young people from all social and economic backgrounds, regardless of your race, gender, sexual orientation or religion we want to hear from you. So if you think you can rise to the challenge, the gates are now open for YOU to share your ideas and get the feedback and creative mentorship you deserve.

To apply, please send an email with the following:

Name

Age

Gender

Location

Main interests

Ethnicity 

Social media

Contact number

We also require a response to one simple but open-ended phrase:

“I am me because…”

You have creative control over how you respond to the statement above – we want to see videos, photos, print designs, the whole sha-bang. So think big, creative and surprise us!

Send applications to talent@latimergroup.org

You must be between the ages of 16-25 and based in the UK.
Application deadline: 18th December 2015

If you are successful you will be required to attend an exclusive launch event at the BBC in London on Monday 11th January.

M20 Christmas Song competition with all.fm

Every year we hear the same songs over and over again, so maybe it’s about time we started to get creative with Christmas. We’re looking to get into the Christmas spirit by trying to invoke come creativity in the local people…

…so we’re running a Christmas song competition in collaboration with all.fm!

This is your chance to write your very own Christmas song and have it played on local radio.

Song brief:

  • The song can be comical, cynical, melancholy or just pure joyful, but most of all original.
  • It could be drum and bass, folk or reggae…whatever you feel!
  • Song must be 2-3 minutes long
  • Recorded at an audible quality – not necessarily professional!

The rules:

  1. Write an original Christmas song
  2. Tweet the song link to all.fm and m20collective to ensure it gets seen by both organisations – soundcloud links preferable
  3. If you prefer email to m20collective@gmail.com
  4. Based on a combination of social media response by the public as well asall.fmand M20 HQ heads – the winner will be decided revealed 16th December

The winner will get the chance to perform their song at all.fm with Fiona Ledgard’s drive time show on 18th December 2015

T’s & C’s

  • You must be available between 5-7pm Friday 18th December for the live performance
  • Soloists, producers and groups welcome to enter (maximum 4 members for the live performance).

And that’s it so get writing your song, for the chance to play live on radio!

 

Local Literature: ‘List of Lists’

Allegorical piece by Fandango Hack; a list of the weird, the beautiful and the atrocious things that make up the world

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The bath, the stainless shovel, the mask, the cat, the bastard and the brothel

The sloth, the slowly sinking, the dogman in the doghouse drunk and slowly drinking

The cot, the dripping tap, the cobra and the Bearn with cradle cap

The nag, the reigns of brass, the hands retracting from the chance to clasp

The mole, the focal point, the oil slick and dripped drawn to anoint.

The eldest, dead and dying, the trier God would love giving up trying

The prayer, the prongs of forks, the damsel in distress popping the cork

The window, the tubby fucker, the golden punishment for copper suckers.

The world, and all its raging wrong, the sorrow in the truth of every song.

The tape, the worm escaping, the lacerated shapes, the plates that Greeks be breaking

The sand, the flooded earth, the man, the battle and the bloody birth

The heart, the tumour clock, the startled pecker pecking and the strangled cock

The news, the bloated leader, the reader of bad blues, the filthy minded bleeder

The grass, the meadow strung with deaths own tinsel, the tooth, the biter of the bitten pencil

The fruit, the guardian of all unknown, the beauty bought and battered cloaks a clone

The worms, the worms that guide us to the core, the claws that burrow, the bully come a bore.

The gas, the flame, the poisoned budgies feather, the world that went to war over the weather.

The world and all its rarest rights, the joy found in the truth of every fight.

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read more at:www.fandangohack.tumblr.com

Future Sounds of Mzansi: Friday 13th March

Theo Kotz previews the Manchester screening of Future Sounds of Mzansi, a journey through the music of the townships, the cape and more

This Friday Oh Bacchanal! is bringing a Manchester first screening Future Sound of Mzansi at Islington Mill. After which the party is on with the man himself, Spoek Mathambo spinning tunes from the townships.

Oh Bacchanal! have been making waves in recent months with their regular shows at The Zombie Shack and Overproof and alongside Spoek, resident Bachannal Ronin brings  his selection of Tropical
bangers into the melting pot. Have a listen to this mix for a little taste:

The Film itself is an in-depth look at the musical landscape of South Africa, chock-full of inspirational tales and words of wisdom and insight from some of the country’s most renowned artists, as well as some exciting newcomers. These span from the township grooves of DJ Spoko and DJ Mustava (who as a pair are responsible for Township Funk – A monumental tune and the scene’s largest global hit to date) and the heart and soul of House in SA – Black Coffee, to the ethereal soundscapes of Felix Laband and the fun-loving experimentation of John Wizards.

Lebogang Rasethaba and Spoek Mathambo - Photographer credit Justice Mukheli 2

The film does much to celebrate and spread the staggering wealth of undeniable talent from this most beautiful and diverse of countries – all through the lens of Nthato Mokagata. Spoek Mathambo, as he’s more widely known, is SA’s own renaissance man, a truly singular talent who’s Midas Touch it would seem knows no bounds.

Spoek is an Artist, Producer, DJ, Songwriter, Rapper and, latterly, filmmaker. His latest solo album Father Creeper was released in 2012. More recently he, Andrew Geldenhuys, Bhekisenzo Cele, Michael Buchanan formed Fantasma along with another titan of South African electronic music: DJ Spoko. Their recent show in London (5th march) was a triumph despite the absence of Spoko and Geldenhuys due to problems with Visas. Their debut full-length Free Love was released Monday 9th March. It’s a stormer and you can stream on YouTube below.

There will be a Q&A with Spoek Mathambo after the screening.

details

When: Friday 13 March 2015, 7.30pm

Where: Islington Mill

How much: £16

Buy tickets here

 

Who is Keisha Thompson a.k.a. SheBeKeke?

Alex talks to Keisha Thompson about what inspires her writing, what Young Identity hopes to achieve and the Manchester literature scene in general

Have you heard SheBeKeke? With an already more-than-impressive portfolio, Keisha Thompson is a valuable member of Manchester’s poetry circuit. As well as being a key member of Inna Voice, another creative group within Young Identity, she recently released her own EP, Abecedarian, and has been published in numerous anthologies.

I’ve had the privilege of seeing Keisha perform a number of times. At each performance, I’ve been struck by how she manages to bring new character and life to the poems (even the ones I’ve heard before), whilst at the same time retaining something undeniably “Keisha-y”. This combination of constant reinvention and a strong creative signature is something she shares with a lot of her fellow Young Identity talent: they all excel in showing one piece in many different lights whilst still putting a personal stamp on their work.

And this personal touch is present throughout the whole creative process: Keisha’s work, for the most part, is based on her own experiences of the world, her family and responses to the political/social landscape around us. Discussing inspiration, she brought up the powerful connection between her identity and her family heritage. In ‘Fickle’, a piece on her EP, Thompson examines her relationship with her father, and how it in turn facilitates her understanding of her own heritage.

Being British with a Jamaican father and Guyanese mother, the identification process is not simple: she does not feel as though any of these three identities/nationalities is wholly her. When she was younger, she never felt particularly British because her household held a lot of Guyanese traditions – but when she was five and visited Guyana, she was no longer so sure she felt so Guyanese. Describing it as a “weird one”, she concluded that she is always somewhere in the middle of being Guyanese, British and Jamaican – though all three identities certainly inspire her.

“Once I’ve processed it, I can write about it”

And Keisha’s own heritage isn’t the only thing from across the world that gets her writing. In terms of the social and political inspirations for her work, tragedies like those that took place in Ferguson last summer, when unarmed black teenager Mike Brown was murdered by white cop Darren Wilson, are important creative sources. But with heavy issues like racism and violence, getting pen to paper can take longer. “I get angry about these things but it takes me a while to process it; I need to process it. Once I’ve processed it, I can write about it,” explained Keisha. Indeed for many writers, taking a step back from material is necessary in order to walk the difficult ground between raw, blunt emotions and tailoring language to suit a creative purpose.

Relating to the Mike Brown case, as well as countless other crimes against people of colour, we discussed Keisha’s views on the need for – and lack of – white voices in race debates. Thompson argued that white voices are necessary when violence happens, because racism is not just ‘a black issue’ – “all races need to acknowledge that racism exists and move forward with that.” Here referencing social theorist Dr Joy DeGruy,  she highlighted the key differences between American and English politics: Keisha sees it that voices from all corners of American society can contribute to discussions about the rights and experiences of those from minority groups, even with only a basic understanding of the issues at hand. But in England, she argued, there is a hostility towards approaching an issue if you are not a member of the group being discussed. This was something I could definitely relate to: in my experience, England is more focused on drawing the lines round “who can say what about what” than on actually getting problems heard and discussed.

“They aren’t just playing with words, they also want to be the voice behind them”

Talk turned to focus on poetry as a vehicle for political speech in general. Is spoken word/rap/poetry more powerful than conventional speech when it comes to communicating ideas to people? Again, the differences between the US and the UK came up. “In America, it is way more powerful than here. When I go to places in New York they aren’t just playing with words, they also want to be the voice behind them” said the performer, noting that in Britain it is much easier to go to an event and not stumble across any political ideas. For various reasons, she felt that the spoken word scene in America was a lot more lively – but she takes inspiration from the fact that it is beginning to stand on its own as a viable platform for creative expression separate from the written/literary scene.

Young Identity, the group of young writers based out of Contact Theatre, are a group changing the narrative on what spoken word is, and can do, here in the UK. As we’ve seen from their constantly growing body of work, which brilliantly fuses the political, the everyday and the creative, they aim to change the game of Manchester’s poetry scene by trying to get people talking about current topics, focusing on politics and thinking actively about their own lives. As evidences this, Keisha noted that in the last One Mic Stand “everyone was doing politics and everyone was brilliant; the quality was outstanding”. Having gone to a previous One Mic Stand, Young Identity’s regular poetry slam, I can vouch for this. At the night I performed at, thoughts on equal rights, sexism and abuse were interwoven boldly and seamlessly with powerful, emotive language, bringing the room alive with the honesty of the work.

As with many Young Identity members, Keisha also works with Inna Voice. Helpfully, she explained the difference between the two groups: “When it first started, Young Identity was the writing group, and then as we started to slam we had Inna Voice. Not everyone was willing or ready to perform from Young Identity so it was easy to make Inna Voice the focus of performance”. Since then, Inna Voice has progressed and it is now its own company, a selective group that are hoping to put on a show next year.

Finally, who would Keisha recommend checking out? In Manchester, Ben Miller, Elmi Ali and Shirley May (one of the driving forces behind Young Identity’s One Mic Stand) are some of her must-sees, as well as Isaiah Hull, the phenomenal winner of June 2014’s One Mic Stand, and Yusra Warsama. Outside of Manchester, Keisha Thompson said she was reading Malika Booker’s Pepper Seed at the moment and could not recommend her enough, as well as loving the works of Warsan Shire and Tanya Shirley. If you want some great inspirational material definitely check out these artists, especially Booker’s latest release (which I am already delving into and loving!).

Going forward from Abecedarian, what can we expect from this talented artist in the future? “Abecedarian means learning your alphabet and it seemed fitting for the title of my first release because I was just trying it out,” explained Thompson. “But now I am ready to focus in on a theme and be more specific with something I can develop”. Performance-wise, she’s also bringing her live show I Wish I Had A Moustache to Manchester’s Contact Theatre this year and it is not something you want to miss out on! Whatever Thompson does in the future, it is going to be entertaining, fun and most of all, inspiring. I’m looking forward to seeing where her talent can, and will, take her.

 

Follow Keisha Thompson on Twitter and on Facebook

Give her bandcamp a follow and download Abecedarian, her EP (you decide the price!): https://bandcamp.com/shebekeke

Check out Young Identity for more information about One Mic Stand: http://www.youngidentity.org/

Watch a performance here

 

-A.Webb

Graphic Designer wanted!

Double D Creative

Position: Graphic Designer
Location: Lymm, North West
Salary: c. £25,000 (dependent on experience)
Contract: Permanent

This is an exciting opportunity for anyone looking for a fresh challenge. The role will involve working on a variety of projects for a great mix of clients from major brands to independents.

You will be expected to tackle advertising, branding and POS briefs as well as reports/brochure work and, anything else that is thrown your way, with well thought-out concepts and an exceptional eye for detail.

As part of a small team you must be a team player, enthusiastic, organised and come with a ‘can do’ approach.

Your daily role will require you to manage your time effectively across a number of projects and deal directly with clients and suppliers so good communication skills are essential.

Outstanding (Mac based) skills in the Adobe Creative Suite; Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign are essential. Knowledge of latest web technologies including HTML5 and CSS3 and an appreciation for UI, UX and general usability would be useful but not a must.

What we’re looking for:

  • Minimum of four years industry experience
  • Experience of dealing directly with clients and suppliers
  • Meticulous attention to detail
  • Ability to work on a number of projects at any one time
  • Good understanding of the print process
  • Confident, yet personable with good communication skills
  • Ability to operate creatively as well as within client brand guidelines

For more info and to apply