Tag Archives: Gigs

M20 Collective do Chorlton Arts Festival

Three years on wards and we’re still on the scene. Ever growing and meeting local artist and creatives to put fantastic events which showcase the talents Manchester has to offer. Our network is growing and the M20 Collective take over sees the coming together of all kinds of unique sounds and visuals in one place, Dulcimer. Manchester artists from musicians and writers to visual artists and crafts men and women. Free all day with a £4 entry for the evening of live music and soul, funk and 60′s music in to the night!
Find out more below about the acts and artists involved! See you there…
PAREIDOLIA
The line up so far includes contemporary fusion band Pareidolia, a melting pot of original sounds and genre styles from jazzy drum and bass to down-tempo soul grooves.
TANGERINECAT
We’re excited to have Tangerinecat a unique duo whose music combines hurdy-gurdy with electronics, keyboards, whistle, mesmerizing vocals and politically-charged lyrics – with a Ukrainian twist.
 
LYCHEE
Lychee is an 8 piece band fronted by Free Wize Men’s Blind MIC,Layfullstop and Mayo De Zulu, with influences ranging from grime and jungle to jazz and indian folk music all produced by Blind MIC, Red Eye HiFi and new up and coming Manchester producer Khadu. It is their first show ever having adapted a 5 piece live band with the existing material and will feature special guests the other 2 members from Free Wize MenAfro Sam and Kiva/KayBey as well as fellow collaborators Sangy and Ellen Lewis.
GOYCO
Ecuadorian duo of talent; think acoustic psychedelic rock influenced by latin american rhythms
AGBEKO
A high-octane afro-rock-funk-psych spectacular from Manchester. Drawing their inspiration and energy from the golden age of 1970s’ Nigerian, Ghanaian and Ethiopian dancefloors, this 7-piece diet-AGBEKO command a wealth of powerful sing-along originals and unique arrangements of afrobeat and ethiojazz rarities.
FOXTALES
Foxtales are a mostly girl band, made up of four girls, and one boy; Amy (guitar/vocals) Cassie (guitar/vocals) Angela (mandolin/vocals) Briony (bass) and The Scoon (drums). They create a dark psychedelic folk, woven with glittering harmonies that tell stories of lust, love and loss.
SLING
Sling blend Hooker-esque licks, stomping drums and meandering bass lines to create something akin to standing on the edge of blues, staring at krautrock and hiphop at the same time
NATALIE WARDLE from the The Beat Chics . Local visual artist and female selecta, will be spinning grooves into the night!
SHORT STORY WORK SHOP
Join writer, Danielle Jawando for a short story workshop 4.00pm- 5.00pm. The workshop is FREE (although participants are asked to make a small donation.) All money raised will be given to YoungMinds, a charity committed to improving the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young adults. You can follow Danielle on: @DanielleJawando she also teaches writing workshops with Creative Writing North West
PLUS… a Laughing Yoga Class in the day to night switch over.
***ARTISTS & CREATIVES EXHIBITING ***
Elnaz Yazdani – Unique Textiles and Jewellery
Ella Blackmore – Handmade Hair Accessories and Vintage
Chan Yan Kim – Urban Photography
Manchester Craft Mafia – Crafts Accessories
Little Beasties – Handmade Headbands
Take a look at the shows we’ve done in the past:
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PARADISE NOW: THIS FRIDAY 25.09.2015

M20 Collective: PARADISE NOW Press release

Daily we live and abide by a set of rules. Rules of law, rules set in place by those who govern us. Rules set in place by each other and society: Rules that go unnoticed, sometimes un-governed and sometimes un-questioned. However what happens when we begin to truly break down these rules? Can we achieve a sense of truly being in today’s society? What happens when we express ourselves outside of the rules? Out with the constraints of right and wrong and articulated through a community of contemporary artists.

In June 2015 M20 Collective submitted an online artist call out with a creative brief formed by one MMU Fine Art scholar. 13 have been chosen to part-take in the PARADISE NOW showcase.

On the 25th September 2015, M20 collective will bring together 13 Artists who have produced a range of pieces from photography collages to installations, international film screenings and illustration. This dialogical exhibition contains a select choice of creativity from Manchester and beyond. Alongside this array of visual provocations, three unique live acts including  headliners Ask My Bull, will stimulate your auditory senses with music that plays outside of genre boundaries and overlooks  the norms of the dominant music scene.

ARTISTS: Alex Lowther-Harris, Alex Webb,Cerys Thorne, Emily May, Daisy Preece,Joao Merinhos, Gemma Nethercliff, Kyle Cartilidge, Leo Robinson, Natalie Wardle, Ray Martin, James Sanders, Peter Silva and Corin Silva (Remoraflims), Alyxandra Press (Pairodocks films), Sian Leyshon and Vicky Clarke.

Curated by Rachel Ferguson and facilitated by the M20 community leaders Joel White and Yemi Bolatiwa, this evening is set to be an exciting group production; where diverse art forms are brought together to communicate one concept: PARADISE, NOW!

A £3 entry fee give will you access to this collaborative event at an impressive arts venue: The Wonder Inn, 29 Shudehill Manchester M4 2AF. Contact m20collective@gmail.com for more details.

/ t: @m20collective for further details and follow the progression #PARADISENOW .

City with a Crisis

M20 Collective are back with another live music event fundraiser in conjunction with some local organisations who are fighting to support the living and housing issues in Manchester. Phil Marzouk, our good will envoy, explains what’s going wrong in our city!

Manchester is a city with a crisis. Last Tuesday, I walked  the 0.4 miles between Manchester Piccadilly and Piccadilly Gardens, and passed 7 of the city centre’s 43 estimated rough sleepers. This number is only increasing. Since 2013, the number of people sleeping on Manchester’s streets has risen by 79%. However, these figures are calculated by council officials over one night, simply counting the number of rough sleepers. This is in fact a huge underestimation and doesn’t account for the city’s ‘hidden homeless’: those not found due to taking refuge in air raid shelters and caves or overlooked during the counts. Manchester’s Booth Centre, a day centre where homeless people can get free advice and support, state they currently see around 170 people a week.

homless ness

However, even in the face of these rising numbers, Manchester City Council refuses to adequately engage with the city’s most vulnerable. Since April 2015, Homeless Rights of Justice Manchester have been setting up camp throughout the city centre in order to raise awareness of this issue and finally get the Council to act justly. The Council’s response was to seek injunctions against the camp rather than establish a dialogue. Due to the intervention of St. Anne’s Church, the camp currently resides safely on Church owned land in St. Anne’s Square, yet the Council pursues an injunction even here.

Blame does not lie solely with the local Council and is indicative of the issues that government cuts are causing for our nation’s most vulnerable citizens, with benefits cuts contributing greatly to these rising numbers. In the wake of severe austerity measures in Westminster, Manchester City Council have had to cut their homelessness budget by £2 million right when the crisis is at its worst. Somehow, money is found to install anti homeless spikes within the town centre. Homeless Rights of Justice Manchester were denied legal aid in order to fight the Council’s continuing evictions, which reflects the national cuts of £350 million from the legal aid budget. You need only walk the streets of  Manchester to see how the cuts are destroying the lives of those who need help the most.

anti hom;less spikes

So it’s time to start taking action. In conjunction with Coffee4Craig,one of Manchester’s leading homeless support charities, we’ll be hosting a fundraiser on the 13th of August at the Castle hotel with live music, a raffle and talks from local charity representatives and housing campaign group Generation Rent. Come down and find out how you can get involved. It’s time to stop letting our nation’s most vulnerable be dehumanised and abandoned.

Phil Marzouk

Gary Brown: Me & Manchester Music

You’ve probably seen Gary Brown snapping away on a night out – he’s one of the city’s biggest photographers and he’s everywhere! Here, he writes about his love for Manchester’s music and gives insider tips for breaking onto the music photography scene…

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I’ve been taking photos of the Manchester Music Scene for about 5 years now and I have a love for music deeper than anything else. Music transcends all other art in the world and touches us in a way nothing else can. I could probably rant for ages but I’ll try and keep things short and sweet!

My story started when D&B giant Metropolis advertised on their Facebook page for a new photographer. I didn’t have any experience in clubs, but as a huge D&B fan I couldn’t let such an opportunity slip. I got a trial at one of their Warehouse Project gigs and promptly borrowed some fairly expensive equipment from the camera shop I was working in (and where I self-taught all of my photography skills) – determined to take this chance.

Luckily I did well enough to get the job for Metropolis and I owe them a lot for taking a chance on me. Working for them has led to working for Hideout Festival, Parklife, Warehouse Project and other big clients.

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Despite all of that my love of music leads me down all avenues. As well as shooting for those promotion giants I am possibly even happier working in a dirty basement with some amazing underground music, and that’s where the true magic lies. The small nights in Manchester are the heart of the scene – it’s there where you will see the Warehouse Project 2016 headline acts playing to crowds of 200 people. I’ve learned to put my trust in Mancunian promoters and often venture to nights when I don’t even know the DJs playing, simply because I trust the Promoters do. Hit & Run, Selective Hearing, Hoya:Hoya, Project13, Now Wave, Pandemik and loads of others are responsible for a large part of my musical education and I hope I’ve paid that back with my documentation of such events.

I suppose I should pass on some photography advice so here’s something that happened to me early on: I met a photographer at a gig. I’d seen his stuff online and thought he was one of the bigger Manchester ‘togs (shooting big gigs for newspapers etc.)

“Do you do this because you love it?” he said. I answered “Yes.”

“Good” he responded, “because if you’re in it for the money, get out now because there isn’t any!”

Only do things you want to do – the second you take paid photography work that you don’t actually want to do, your work will suffer and so will your love of the art. In music photography that means photographing the music too, not schmoozing round backstage getting trashed with the other hangers-on in the hope you’ll become best friends with the DJs!

There are a few other things I think every photographer should take on board:

  • Know about light & never stop learning: If stuff goes wrong figure out why and how to deal with it in future. If you can learn how light behaves and how your camera interacts with it then you can create any image you want.
  • Don’t be a dick: More a general rule of life than anything. There are hundreds of decent photographers out there looking for work – if you go round acting like a knob or being difficult then your clients can quickly find someone new.
  • LEARN ABOUT LIGHT: This is so important it needs saying twice. If you can quickly assess the light in any given situation, you can be quicker at setting your camera up and getting those killer shots!

That’s about it for now. I’m writing a series of articles on my blog at http://gbmultimedia.co.uk with more tips and techniques so head there if you want to know more. Or feel free to get in touch on Facebook or Twitter etc. I’m not a dick so I’m always happy to answer some questions!

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Thanks Gary! All photos (c) Gary Brown

For The Young, Talented and Unsigned

Alex Rigg tells us exactly why its so important to support the hard work and talent of Manchester’s young local musicians…

Music has the power to run society. As well as all of the more famous hits and celebrities, there are also unsigned acts featuring powerful talent that can send messages to society’s ears. Music is strong, but stronger to those who choose to use it with determination and talent. Bands and solo performers are key to how everybody behaves on Earth. Musical chimes of beauty can be created, but by all kinds of people. Unsigned bands can be inspirational and bold, bringing the best out of audience members.

Manchester is fortunate for the large amount of local talent that gets to be experienced in venues across the North West – but are you seeing them? There is so much people are missing that is right beneath their noses. The sensation of live music is so great, for both the performers and the fans. Young talent is needed to keep the world informed on the passion and beauty of musical sound. Whether it is acoustic or rock or a DJ, all of the sounds successfully open up emotions, both happy and sad.

From an audience perspective, you can build up with countless emotions at the same moment. It makes you think and wonder, while making you enjoy such an amazing time. Gigs with unsigned bands are not a form of wasting time, but bringing something extraordinary into your life that you can be first to witness. The vibes of success will ring into your ears where magical words whisper to you.

Great melodies can be transformed to passionate tunes for all ears within Manchester. Performances in pubs, nightclubs or stages all give out the same message. The message of life.

– Alex RIgg.