Tag Archives: Live

An interview w/ Chris Knight aka Cervo: Inside Banana hill, the local scene and music

It’s always good to catch up with the purveyors of the left-field  and subcultural music scene to find out what’s happening in and around our town and this guy plays a hand in  pushing music of the world around the northwest and beyond. In a couple of week’s he’ll be gracing the Ask My Bull Ep launch with his vinyl collection, so we thought we’d get to know him that little bit more ahead of this.
So Chris (aka Cervo), what can you tell us about your music events career so far?
Well we started very small doing live music & trying to DJ in a tiny bar in Sheffield, and sort of developed it from there. It doesn’t really feel like career as such, more of a thing that we like to do in our spare time! None of us rely on it as an income so it gives us a bit of freedom to do interesting stuff without worrying about profit margins and things like that. We certainly didn’t set out with any notions of being able to run big warehouse parties in different cities and flying artists in from all over the world but somehow it’s turned out like that.
Any you DJ too? What kind of music styles
Yes, it took me a long time to learn the basics (shouts to everyone who came to early Banana Hill parties and endured the countless clangers) but it has become a big passion of mine. I really enjoy being able to develop different styles so it’s constantly changing but is broadly pinned down by a love of classic & contemporary African & Latin American music of varying styles, combined with soul, hip hop, disco, house & electronic music.
chrisknight
 
When and how did you start getting into music as something that you do in the public eye?
I was in a band for a few years from when I was around 16, so I guess it started around then that I began to ‘perform’ in front of other people and music became a big part of my life.
 
What can you tell us about Banana Hill? 
So Banana Hill was originally a music blog set up by Jack (JVC), named after a small grass verge near his house in South Manchester. We met in the first week of university in Sheffield, instantly found common ground with a lot of music and ended up doing a weekly show together on the student radio station – initially a pretty odd combination of both our tastes, ranging from hip hop, grime and bass music to post punk, garage rock and disco. The nights followed this pattern, so were at that time a little bit haphazard in terms of direction – which was totally fine, but it was during our 2nd year that we discovered what it was that we both felt massively passionate about and that kind of set out where Banana Hill has gone since then.
We were helping with a fundraiser club night for a hospital in the DRC, and set about finding Congolese music to play on the night – which is amazing it it’s own right – and this opened up doors to a load of music we’d never heard before. The stuff that caught our ears initially was the high tempo kuduro coming from Angola  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWr-sJDXbDghttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpzzWukSNYw), afro-house and the crossover styles of producers such as Batida.
We started learning all we could & pushing those sounds, along with a whole load of other African music styles on the blog, in our DJ sets and at our parties, and that’s kind of carried on until now.  Alongside this we got heavily into the warehouse party scene in Sheffield that I feel is more prevalent than a lot of cities due to a huge number of disused industrial spaces – we wanted to combine those settings and the house & techno that you’d tend to find there with more wide-ranging sounds from around the globe.
bananahill
 
Who’s been integral to your progression in the events and music scene?
As with a lot of art & music scenes, the community that you become part of is so important. Sheffield is such a good place for that, and venues such as The Harley and the people working for them were really helpful and are still ace to work with. There’s a network of promoters, DJs and artists there that all help each other out – sharing advice is essential for events in particular, dealing with booking agents, what to do when stuff goes wrong etc. In Manchester working with Soup Kitchen has been amazing, and we’ve started to find a great set of people to work with over here.
 
Who’s been you favourite act that you’ve booked?
This is tricky…I don’t want to single anyone out as we have been lucky enough to meet so many artists who have become good friends. If I can dodge the question like a highly skilled politician, I can say the most interesting act (both in terms of music and looking after them) has to be Nozinja (Shangaan Electro) and his dancers. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHgBZ-60i7k)
 
Any one out there you’d like to virtually salute on their efforts in the scene?
Sorry if this a bit of a long list…
In Sheffield – The Harley, Hope Works, Bungalows & Bears, promoters & people like Lunar, Thrillhouse, NLR, Pretty Pretty Good, No Uniform, Bunga Bunga, Tramlines, Semi Detached, Huddle, TTC, SoulJam, Don’t Look Now, Funk Drunk etc.
In Manchester – Soup Kitchen & Dan Hampson, Hidden, promoters & people like So Flute, Heads Up, Hi Ku, Inside Out, John Loveless, Meat Free, Reform Radio, Zutekh, Contours & Werkha etc, and of course M20 Collective.
On a wider scale the crews who are doing amazing stuff include Mawimbi in Paris, No Globe in Glasgow, Samedia Shebeen in Edinburgh, Fiesta Bombarda, Kitchen Street, Africa Oye, No Fakin & Abandon Silence in Liverpool, Brotherhood Sound, Butter Side Up & KMAH Radio in Leeds, Highlife, Huntleys & Palmers, Wormfood, Turf, Tessellate, Lunatick Records and loads more in London. Sorry for everyone I’ve inevitably missed.
 
How do you think the visual arts and music scene can come together?
I think it is and will continue to do so – the two complement eachother so well. There are some artists such as Lone who insist on touring with a visual artist which I really like. We work with an artist called Bethany Porteous who does our poster art and decor on some of the bigger shows, and we’re currently looking at doing more projects to bring both elements together.
bethany.jpg
Above: Artwork by Bethany Porteous
What would you do next if you could do anything, either in the local community or for yourself?
Closer to home, I think something that everyone has noticed over the past year is the amount of homeless people on the streets in the UK – this stems from a whole host of cutbacks across social care and public services that are massively starting to bite. So I guess it would be to make everyone think about other people a bit more – particularly that waxy-faced bastard who calls the shots these days.
 
Anything exciting coming up?
We’ll be working with Thristian from the Boiler Room a lot more closely this year, and I have my first release coming in June. And plenty of shows in Manchester, Sheffield and London 🙂

M20 Christmas Song competition with all.fm

Every year we hear the same songs over and over again, so maybe it’s about time we started to get creative with Christmas. We’re looking to get into the Christmas spirit by trying to invoke come creativity in the local people…

…so we’re running a Christmas song competition in collaboration with all.fm!

This is your chance to write your very own Christmas song and have it played on local radio.

Song brief:

  • The song can be comical, cynical, melancholy or just pure joyful, but most of all original.
  • It could be drum and bass, folk or reggae…whatever you feel!
  • Song must be 2-3 minutes long
  • Recorded at an audible quality – not necessarily professional!

The rules:

  1. Write an original Christmas song
  2. Tweet the song link to all.fm and m20collective to ensure it gets seen by both organisations – soundcloud links preferable
  3. If you prefer email to m20collective@gmail.com
  4. Based on a combination of social media response by the public as well asall.fmand M20 HQ heads – the winner will be decided revealed 16th December

The winner will get the chance to perform their song at all.fm with Fiona Ledgard’s drive time show on 18th December 2015

T’s & C’s

  • You must be available between 5-7pm Friday 18th December for the live performance
  • Soloists, producers and groups welcome to enter (maximum 4 members for the live performance).

And that’s it so get writing your song, for the chance to play live on radio!

 

PARADISE NOW: THIS FRIDAY 25.09.2015

M20 Collective: PARADISE NOW Press release

Daily we live and abide by a set of rules. Rules of law, rules set in place by those who govern us. Rules set in place by each other and society: Rules that go unnoticed, sometimes un-governed and sometimes un-questioned. However what happens when we begin to truly break down these rules? Can we achieve a sense of truly being in today’s society? What happens when we express ourselves outside of the rules? Out with the constraints of right and wrong and articulated through a community of contemporary artists.

In June 2015 M20 Collective submitted an online artist call out with a creative brief formed by one MMU Fine Art scholar. 13 have been chosen to part-take in the PARADISE NOW showcase.

On the 25th September 2015, M20 collective will bring together 13 Artists who have produced a range of pieces from photography collages to installations, international film screenings and illustration. This dialogical exhibition contains a select choice of creativity from Manchester and beyond. Alongside this array of visual provocations, three unique live acts including  headliners Ask My Bull, will stimulate your auditory senses with music that plays outside of genre boundaries and overlooks  the norms of the dominant music scene.

ARTISTS: Alex Lowther-Harris, Alex Webb,Cerys Thorne, Emily May, Daisy Preece,Joao Merinhos, Gemma Nethercliff, Kyle Cartilidge, Leo Robinson, Natalie Wardle, Ray Martin, James Sanders, Peter Silva and Corin Silva (Remoraflims), Alyxandra Press (Pairodocks films), Sian Leyshon and Vicky Clarke.

Curated by Rachel Ferguson and facilitated by the M20 community leaders Joel White and Yemi Bolatiwa, this evening is set to be an exciting group production; where diverse art forms are brought together to communicate one concept: PARADISE, NOW!

A £3 entry fee give will you access to this collaborative event at an impressive arts venue: The Wonder Inn, 29 Shudehill Manchester M4 2AF. Contact m20collective@gmail.com for more details.

/ t: @m20collective for further details and follow the progression #PARADISENOW .

The Sessions of March

We got some inside info on one Manchester’s most exciting collaboration projects, and you know M20 collective are all about collaboration. Kris Extance tells us all about The Sessions of March…

TSOM

Header image: Jenna and the G’s

What is TSOM to those who are not in the know?

TSOM is a collection of live music & video recording sessions that took place during the month of March 2015. There are roughly 24 artists involved, with around 80 tracks recorded. It is a snapshot of the phenomenally diverse and talented independent creative scene in Manchester. There is huge variety within the sessions ranging from acoustic singer songwriters to gypsy-punk bands to 9-piece dub bands to cosmic dross space adventurers and that is to describe but a few! There are even a few special one-off improvised collaborations and special renditions of existing material involved as well. In essence, it is a collection of music we love that we want the world to see.

Who makes up the TSOM team?
Myself [Kris Extance], as founder/organiser. Audio recording and production was done by WR Audio, which consists of Dan Watkins and Biff Roxby, working alongside the video guys from Midnight Sounds headed by Dan Jones and accompanied by freelance camera man Matthew Jones. We also have Jason Badiozzaman on board, who is helping with social media and post-production organisation.

How did you come up with the idea?
Up until the beginning of this year, I had been involved with a unique music venue for 5 years and was the General Manager for the final 3 of these. The venue’s history is quite unusual, with constantly evolving family of creative individuals working tirelessly to make a place like no other. A place that supported local talent in all its variety, and a place where like-minded creative individuals could meet and enjoy the music and art they loved.

Our ethos was to support local talent and put on eclectic parties like no other venue. It was one of those places where if you didn’t look up what was on you would never know what to expect. To be honest, even if you did look it up you still might not have a clue! It was as grass-roots as you could get, with too many people to mention who were crucial in its set-up and running virtually all artists and musicians. The tag line I used whilst working there was ‘for creative people, by creative people’. Like a lot of independent businesses, we soon realised that in order to make a living for ourselves, we needed to have a balance between what we truly believed in and what would generate income.

We successfully managed to achieve a balance we were happy with, however at one point due to various reasons we suddenly lost a lot of creative control. We felt like our ethos was being compromised, and we had put too much into the venue to just go on and allow this to happen. The difficult decision was made to walk away from the project, taking our ethos and everything we had learned with us. It was at this point the sessions plan was formulated, everyone had put too much into the venue to walk away without doing something special!

I wanted to create a snapshot of why we put so much into the venue and what we most enjoyed about it, the music! I contacted WR Audio, who had become firm friends through working with us at the venue, and Dan Jones had worked in the venue alongside me already. We put together a plan of action and both teams agreed to do this for “mates-rates” despite being professional outfits, just because they believed in the project and why I wanted to do it. The initial team was formed and I organised as many of our favourite acts we had discovered through the venue into a month of recording sessions.

MONEYSHOT

What is the ‘ mantra’ behind it, so to speak?
Respect for independent musicians in all their variety. To help good people, who make good music, for the right reasons; mainly because they love doing it.

Why do you think it is important for the Manchester music scene?
For me, it’s the showcasing of such variety and talent all in one place. It’s why we used to love the venue initially, because it allowed us to put all the local talent we loved in one building. You can find so many amazing scenes in Manchester however; finding something that links all these scenes together is a much harder task. I love going to events where there is something for everyone, and I hope in the sessions this is the case as well. I also think it’s an important way of helping people discover new independent music. You may look to find one thing, but discover something else as entirely.

How have you developed a personal passion for music?
I love how music can make you forget all anxiety and worry. I love that if the right song comes on, especially when performed live, the world ceases to exist and you are in a serene moment of appreciation and awe. The huge diverse nature of music is incredible, and I feel it is one of the most important and beautiful forms of expressions there is. I play bass myself, and have always been in bands since the age of around 15. Although I have never considered myself a musician, it has always been a hobby not a profession. For the last 5 years or so, I have been surrounded by musicians who surpass my playing in every aspect and I’ve become more a music facilitator. I’m able to get to know a huge creative community both on and off stage, which has been – and will continue to be – something special. I have spent all my time trying to help the people who make music I respect and appreciate, because I want to hear more of it and I want more people to hear it too. I have never claimed to be a musical expert, but I know one thing for certain: I love music and my passion for helping music happen has done nothing but grow and grow. Music brings people together, and allows them to communicate through a beautiful universal language and that is important in this day and age more than ever.

How did you manage to recruit all of these musicians to participate?
I am lucky enough to call most of these musicians’ friends who I have got to know throughout the venue over the years. It was simply a case of calling them up and explaining the reason for the project. We were fortunate enough that everyone loved the idea and wanted to support it by taking part. I could not have more respect for all those involved!

redeyehifilive

Red Eye Hifi LIVE

What does collaboration in music mean to you?

Collaboration in music to me means a world of exciting possibilities of communication through sound. When a person plays their own music, they are expressing themselves and their ideas openly. Collaboration in music is a beautiful moment where people come and express themselves and their ideas together as one. It is a way of bringing people together from any background for a united purpose.

What is the most important outcome for the project?
The most important outcome is that as many people see the music as possible. I hope people discover new music through this project, and it gives some form of exposure to incredibly hard working independent musicians who deserve it. They have made my life so much more enjoyable over the last few years and I want to return the favour.

Noon – ‘I wish I knew how to sing’ live video

Anything else you’d like to tell us about TSOM?
We are also going to try and use this first set of sessions to raise enough money to do a second set of sessions. This will most probably be in the form of a Kickstarter. We didn’t come close to capturing all the artists we wanted to cover in the first round of recording. Due to popular demand by the musicians, we also have a long-term plan to turn this into some form of live event. So please, if you like The Sessions of March and the reasons behind it, then please support us in any way you can as it would mean the world to us.

Follow the journey on facebook: The sessions of march

Interview by Yemi Bolatiwa

City with a Crisis

M20 Collective are back with another live music event fundraiser in conjunction with some local organisations who are fighting to support the living and housing issues in Manchester. Phil Marzouk, our good will envoy, explains what’s going wrong in our city!

Manchester is a city with a crisis. Last Tuesday, I walked  the 0.4 miles between Manchester Piccadilly and Piccadilly Gardens, and passed 7 of the city centre’s 43 estimated rough sleepers. This number is only increasing. Since 2013, the number of people sleeping on Manchester’s streets has risen by 79%. However, these figures are calculated by council officials over one night, simply counting the number of rough sleepers. This is in fact a huge underestimation and doesn’t account for the city’s ‘hidden homeless’: those not found due to taking refuge in air raid shelters and caves or overlooked during the counts. Manchester’s Booth Centre, a day centre where homeless people can get free advice and support, state they currently see around 170 people a week.

homless ness

However, even in the face of these rising numbers, Manchester City Council refuses to adequately engage with the city’s most vulnerable. Since April 2015, Homeless Rights of Justice Manchester have been setting up camp throughout the city centre in order to raise awareness of this issue and finally get the Council to act justly. The Council’s response was to seek injunctions against the camp rather than establish a dialogue. Due to the intervention of St. Anne’s Church, the camp currently resides safely on Church owned land in St. Anne’s Square, yet the Council pursues an injunction even here.

Blame does not lie solely with the local Council and is indicative of the issues that government cuts are causing for our nation’s most vulnerable citizens, with benefits cuts contributing greatly to these rising numbers. In the wake of severe austerity measures in Westminster, Manchester City Council have had to cut their homelessness budget by £2 million right when the crisis is at its worst. Somehow, money is found to install anti homeless spikes within the town centre. Homeless Rights of Justice Manchester were denied legal aid in order to fight the Council’s continuing evictions, which reflects the national cuts of £350 million from the legal aid budget. You need only walk the streets of  Manchester to see how the cuts are destroying the lives of those who need help the most.

anti hom;less spikes

So it’s time to start taking action. In conjunction with Coffee4Craig,one of Manchester’s leading homeless support charities, we’ll be hosting a fundraiser on the 13th of August at the Castle hotel with live music, a raffle and talks from local charity representatives and housing campaign group Generation Rent. Come down and find out how you can get involved. It’s time to stop letting our nation’s most vulnerable be dehumanised and abandoned.

Phil Marzouk

BASEMENT SESSION #5… Plume // Chris Jam // Gilberto Da Silva

Join us for the latest chapter of M20COLLECTIVE’s new weekly creative sessions in the Northern Quarter…

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It’s thursday again and you know what that means! Back to the Basement.

This week we have an eclectic trio of acts making their first appearances in the depths of Montpelliers. Come and warm your soul as the winter closes in.

acts

Plume

A four piece trip hop group based in Manchester that have a distinctive sound influenced by electronic textures, the band fuse hip hop grooves and lush vocals to create and immersive soundscape. They only named their band this week but you may find recordings sneakily leaked onto youtube without a tag. The quality of musicianship and attention to flow is clear. With the experience of The Mouse Outfit and 8 GOLD RINGS drummer Joe Luckin and the raw talent and emotion of singer Caroline Hendry I expect big things for Plume.

Chris Jam

Enthralling spoken word and slam poet whose charm and wisdom proceed him. Also a really good bloke who does great work in the community using his knowledge and skills to energise youths.

Gilberto Da Silva

Fresh back from a year in France Gilberto has teamed up with Johannes Samland Bowling the saxophonist from Pareidolia and others to work on material. Building on the soul vibe of his last project The Shaded Arrows Gilberto has progressed his musicality. M20’s answer to Seal, with this new band format we expect Gilberto will be tearing up the Manchester music scene this Winter.

details

When: Thursday 23rd October, 8pm

Where: Montpelliers Cafebar, 42 Back Turner Street, Manchester M4

How much: £0!

Basement Sessions #5 on Facebook

See you in the basement! M20 x

01/04/14: Solomon’s LIVE

Every Tuesday at Solomon Grundy, M20 Collective hosts its weekly showcase of some of the many, many diverse musical talents in and around M20. This week, all of our acts feature strong female lead vocals, over a backdrop of indie/acoustic/folk/alternative/rock vibes… It’s a chance to discover some of the wonderful creativity, and who knows? Maybe you’ll find your favourite artist you’ve never heard.

Check out the sounds of this week’s acts before you come down:

Literature Thieves

http://www.facebook.com/literaturethieves

CAVE

http://www.facebook.com/pages/CAVE/689608897724184?fref=ts

 

Abigail King

http://www.soundcloud.com/abigail-king/two-steps-forward-three-men

And did I mention that its £0? We’ll see you Tuesday!

www.facebook.com/events/1389183827973256/

M20 x