Tag Archives: Soul

Artist Review: Lucy Mae

We’re always looking to keep up to date with whats going on in the local scene, and picking up on original music cultivation in the area is very much on the top of our list of what we want to support. This originals projects has a sense of revival to it, jazzy blues and swing, and it’s definitely a good thing!

We first encountered these guys via the ol’ social media, whilst looking for acts for our canal street event Live in the Village. Lucy, Luc Phan and Alex Martin of Ask My Bull graced the audience with jazz almost year and a half ago, and even now these musicians who currently go under Lucy Mae and are still on our radar.

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The umbrella of projects is lead vocally by Lucy- Camba-Bermudez. Her voice has an air of arousal, with a rustic edge on a foundation of broken blues. She’s accompanied by a bountiful brass section, Soprano Saxophone (Ed Kainyek) Tenor Saxophone (Caitlin Laing) and Baritone Saxophone (Tom Harris). With Christian Van Fields (Keyboard/Organ), Luc Phan (Guitar), Joshua Cavanagh -Brierley on Bass, and Joe Wood on Drums . The potential of this outfit not to be doubted and we’re keen to see what 2016 will bring for them. The Mudez Project is the latest musical venture consisting of traditional jazz-swing in it’s more modern state; re-instilling the importance of classic musicality.

One track in particular ‘ State of denial‘ encompasses the sound at its most triumphant.

Another of the projects is a duet between Lucy and Luc (see image below), which sees the couple come together in a stripped back acoustic style, that silences crowds. Listen to more here: with this smooth rendition of Portis head’s ‘Give me a reason’.

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These guys have got to be some of the most dedicated and  active musicians in the area and you’re bound to see them on a live music line up in chorlton or the city centre whether its putting on their own music or providing a platform or house band for others. Revivalist, methodical and passionate Lucy Mae are doing what we (M20) like to see! Making music, movements and keeping the live music scene a-thrive!

Click here to watch their latest video “Through You” and check out more about this collage of musicians on their Facebook page.

You can also watch them for real! at their residency at The Lodge at Richmond Tea Rooms every Saturday, it’s an Alice In Wonderland themed bar that’s part of the Tea Room or experience the sound on Sunday 21st Feb at Hold Fast Northern Quarter and many other places for that matter! we’re spoilt for choice.

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The Sessions of March

We got some inside info on one Manchester’s most exciting collaboration projects, and you know M20 collective are all about collaboration. Kris Extance tells us all about The Sessions of March…

TSOM

Header image: Jenna and the G’s

What is TSOM to those who are not in the know?

TSOM is a collection of live music & video recording sessions that took place during the month of March 2015. There are roughly 24 artists involved, with around 80 tracks recorded. It is a snapshot of the phenomenally diverse and talented independent creative scene in Manchester. There is huge variety within the sessions ranging from acoustic singer songwriters to gypsy-punk bands to 9-piece dub bands to cosmic dross space adventurers and that is to describe but a few! There are even a few special one-off improvised collaborations and special renditions of existing material involved as well. In essence, it is a collection of music we love that we want the world to see.

Who makes up the TSOM team?
Myself [Kris Extance], as founder/organiser. Audio recording and production was done by WR Audio, which consists of Dan Watkins and Biff Roxby, working alongside the video guys from Midnight Sounds headed by Dan Jones and accompanied by freelance camera man Matthew Jones. We also have Jason Badiozzaman on board, who is helping with social media and post-production organisation.

How did you come up with the idea?
Up until the beginning of this year, I had been involved with a unique music venue for 5 years and was the General Manager for the final 3 of these. The venue’s history is quite unusual, with constantly evolving family of creative individuals working tirelessly to make a place like no other. A place that supported local talent in all its variety, and a place where like-minded creative individuals could meet and enjoy the music and art they loved.

Our ethos was to support local talent and put on eclectic parties like no other venue. It was one of those places where if you didn’t look up what was on you would never know what to expect. To be honest, even if you did look it up you still might not have a clue! It was as grass-roots as you could get, with too many people to mention who were crucial in its set-up and running virtually all artists and musicians. The tag line I used whilst working there was ‘for creative people, by creative people’. Like a lot of independent businesses, we soon realised that in order to make a living for ourselves, we needed to have a balance between what we truly believed in and what would generate income.

We successfully managed to achieve a balance we were happy with, however at one point due to various reasons we suddenly lost a lot of creative control. We felt like our ethos was being compromised, and we had put too much into the venue to just go on and allow this to happen. The difficult decision was made to walk away from the project, taking our ethos and everything we had learned with us. It was at this point the sessions plan was formulated, everyone had put too much into the venue to walk away without doing something special!

I wanted to create a snapshot of why we put so much into the venue and what we most enjoyed about it, the music! I contacted WR Audio, who had become firm friends through working with us at the venue, and Dan Jones had worked in the venue alongside me already. We put together a plan of action and both teams agreed to do this for “mates-rates” despite being professional outfits, just because they believed in the project and why I wanted to do it. The initial team was formed and I organised as many of our favourite acts we had discovered through the venue into a month of recording sessions.

MONEYSHOT

What is the ‘ mantra’ behind it, so to speak?
Respect for independent musicians in all their variety. To help good people, who make good music, for the right reasons; mainly because they love doing it.

Why do you think it is important for the Manchester music scene?
For me, it’s the showcasing of such variety and talent all in one place. It’s why we used to love the venue initially, because it allowed us to put all the local talent we loved in one building. You can find so many amazing scenes in Manchester however; finding something that links all these scenes together is a much harder task. I love going to events where there is something for everyone, and I hope in the sessions this is the case as well. I also think it’s an important way of helping people discover new independent music. You may look to find one thing, but discover something else as entirely.

How have you developed a personal passion for music?
I love how music can make you forget all anxiety and worry. I love that if the right song comes on, especially when performed live, the world ceases to exist and you are in a serene moment of appreciation and awe. The huge diverse nature of music is incredible, and I feel it is one of the most important and beautiful forms of expressions there is. I play bass myself, and have always been in bands since the age of around 15. Although I have never considered myself a musician, it has always been a hobby not a profession. For the last 5 years or so, I have been surrounded by musicians who surpass my playing in every aspect and I’ve become more a music facilitator. I’m able to get to know a huge creative community both on and off stage, which has been – and will continue to be – something special. I have spent all my time trying to help the people who make music I respect and appreciate, because I want to hear more of it and I want more people to hear it too. I have never claimed to be a musical expert, but I know one thing for certain: I love music and my passion for helping music happen has done nothing but grow and grow. Music brings people together, and allows them to communicate through a beautiful universal language and that is important in this day and age more than ever.

How did you manage to recruit all of these musicians to participate?
I am lucky enough to call most of these musicians’ friends who I have got to know throughout the venue over the years. It was simply a case of calling them up and explaining the reason for the project. We were fortunate enough that everyone loved the idea and wanted to support it by taking part. I could not have more respect for all those involved!

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Red Eye Hifi LIVE

What does collaboration in music mean to you?

Collaboration in music to me means a world of exciting possibilities of communication through sound. When a person plays their own music, they are expressing themselves and their ideas openly. Collaboration in music is a beautiful moment where people come and express themselves and their ideas together as one. It is a way of bringing people together from any background for a united purpose.

What is the most important outcome for the project?
The most important outcome is that as many people see the music as possible. I hope people discover new music through this project, and it gives some form of exposure to incredibly hard working independent musicians who deserve it. They have made my life so much more enjoyable over the last few years and I want to return the favour.

Noon – ‘I wish I knew how to sing’ live video

Anything else you’d like to tell us about TSOM?
We are also going to try and use this first set of sessions to raise enough money to do a second set of sessions. This will most probably be in the form of a Kickstarter. We didn’t come close to capturing all the artists we wanted to cover in the first round of recording. Due to popular demand by the musicians, we also have a long-term plan to turn this into some form of live event. So please, if you like The Sessions of March and the reasons behind it, then please support us in any way you can as it would mean the world to us.

Follow the journey on facebook: The sessions of march

Interview by Yemi Bolatiwa

BASEMENT SESSION #5… Plume // Chris Jam // Gilberto Da Silva

Join us for the latest chapter of M20COLLECTIVE’s new weekly creative sessions in the Northern Quarter…

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It’s thursday again and you know what that means! Back to the Basement.

This week we have an eclectic trio of acts making their first appearances in the depths of Montpelliers. Come and warm your soul as the winter closes in.

acts

Plume

A four piece trip hop group based in Manchester that have a distinctive sound influenced by electronic textures, the band fuse hip hop grooves and lush vocals to create and immersive soundscape. They only named their band this week but you may find recordings sneakily leaked onto youtube without a tag. The quality of musicianship and attention to flow is clear. With the experience of The Mouse Outfit and 8 GOLD RINGS drummer Joe Luckin and the raw talent and emotion of singer Caroline Hendry I expect big things for Plume.

Chris Jam

Enthralling spoken word and slam poet whose charm and wisdom proceed him. Also a really good bloke who does great work in the community using his knowledge and skills to energise youths.

Gilberto Da Silva

Fresh back from a year in France Gilberto has teamed up with Johannes Samland Bowling the saxophonist from Pareidolia and others to work on material. Building on the soul vibe of his last project The Shaded Arrows Gilberto has progressed his musicality. M20’s answer to Seal, with this new band format we expect Gilberto will be tearing up the Manchester music scene this Winter.

details

When: Thursday 23rd October, 8pm

Where: Montpelliers Cafebar, 42 Back Turner Street, Manchester M4

How much: £0!

Basement Sessions #5 on Facebook

See you in the basement! M20 x

M20MIX #4

Naked (On Drugs) – This Gift

The intro announces this tune like a clarion call to the damned. Hardcore style drums propel this along at a frightening speed into the myriad of eerie sounds of the night. By the time it’s all over you’ll wonder what the hell happened and want to get back on the ride.

Aphex Twin – minipops67 ( 120.2 ) ( source field mix )

Alright so you’ve heard it already. Still; it’s Aphex Twin, it’s new, it’s class… what the fuck else have I been listening to?

Mistoa Poltsa – DOCTOR DOCTRINE

Sounds like if the Adams Family started wiggin’ out to the band from Dusk ‘til Dawn in a tomb, or something. It’s loud, there’s howling, I love it.

Douga – Kids of Tomorrow

The first track off the album ‘The Silent Well’. The album is full of irrepressible melodies like this one coupled off-kilter sounds and textures. I recommend the whole thing. This one sounds like The Charlatans, which isn’t a bad thing.

Trus’me – I want you (Alan Fitzpatrick RMX)

The latest released on Trus’me’s label Prime Numbers sees Trus’me’s triumphant Treat Me Right remixed. This cut is aimed right at the dancefloor’s temple. The vocal is delightfully fucked up, the hats are insatiable and the underwater synths that hit halfway elevate this into something special.

Garth Be – Monday Club/Tuesday Nite

Manchester’s own Garth BE released The Seven Movements in the spring to universal acclaim. With ultra-tight grooves and an abundance of soul it covers all corners of the dancefloor. This track is a smooth roller, with an African-tinged beat and deliciously crafted synths over a vocal urging you ‘on and on’. The USA import edition of The Seven Movements is released Monday (15th September) at Piccadilly Records on ultra-high quality 180 gram vinyl. There’s only 300 copies too so get on it!

Buena Vista Social Club – Chan Chan

I got drunk drinking wine and listening to this the other day, it was something of a re-revelation. Ry Cooder met Juan de Marcos González sometime in the 90’s, and together they recorded with a load of veteran Cuban musicians that had played at the social club of the same name some 50 years previously. The result was this.

Theo Kotz